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Frequently Asked Questions

Fire Safety

     

Q5)  Is there a barn building material that is fire-proof?

Although there are several barn building materials that are considered fire-proof, it is still possible for damaging and deadly fires to start within the walls of these barns. As we know, fires usually feed first on the flammable material that can be found inside the barn. However, in the event of a fire, the over-all damage to the structure of the building will be minimized if a fire-proof building material is used in the construction. This can allow for easier and quicker clean-up and rebuilding, post-fire. It is also possible (but not guaranteed) that using fire proof building material will prevent fires from spreading as quickly.

Some examples of fire-proof building materials include poured concrete, concrete block, metal, and brick. Although they all have the advantage of being fire-proof, each material also has its drawbacks. For example, poured concrete is not porous and will sweat in the heat of summer. Brick is known to be very expensive. Metal buildings such as pole barns can be noisy and easily damaged. 

Although fire-proof building materials can be an added security, they do not take the place of normal fire-safety precautions, plans and exercises. In conjunction with a good fire-safety plan, using fire-proof building materials allows you to put one more roadblock in the path of a possible fire.

If you know of any other tips on dealing with a fire emergency that have not been listed, please send us an email so that we may include them in the list. We can protect ourselves and our horses more effectively if we know what the possibilities are.

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